Friday-Sunday, February 22-24, 2019, Miami, Florida

The First Annual Miami General Medical Oncology Symposium

Dates:
February 22-24, 2019

Location:
JW Marriott Miami Turnberry Resort
19999 West Country Club Drive
Miami, FL 33180
Hotel Phone: (305) 932-6200

Meeting Room:
Garden Ballroom (Lobby Level)
Hotel Accommodations:
A special discounted room rate of $329 (plus applicable tax and resort fee) is available to conference attendees at the JW Marriott Miami Turnberry Resort. Please see the Location tab for additional details.

 
Note from Moderator
In February 2019 Research To Practice will host the inaugural Miami General Medical Oncology Symposium. This one-of-a-kind offering will span 3 days and feature a stellar multidisciplinary faculty panel and a unique blend of short didactic presentations, lively moderated panel discussions and dedicated Q&A sessions. To augment the conference interactivity, each clinician will be provided with a specially configured iPad® to use throughout the program to participate in audience polling, view all the presentation slides and anonymously submit questions to the panelists. The conference’s educational design and the topics that will be discussed offer interested clinicians the opportunity to access the in-depth perspectives of some of the top minds in the field regarding significant new data sets, promising treatment strategies and key interdisciplinary management considerations in the care of patients with myriad forms of cancer.

As you begin to make your plans for 2019, we hope you will join us in sunny South Florida for a learning experience unlike any other.

Moderator
Neil Love, MD
Research To Practice
Miami, Florida

Faculty:

Friday — 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Keynote Lecture: Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy — A New Era in Cancer Immunotherapy

David L Porter, MD
Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System
Jodi Fisher Horowitz Professor of Leukemia Care Excellence
Director, Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Keynote Panel

Jonathan L Kaufman, MD
Associate Professor of
Hematology and Medical Oncology
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University
Atlanta, Georgia

Sattva S Neelapu, MD
Professor and Deputy Chair ad interim
Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma
The University of Texas
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, Texas

Saturday — 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Colorectal and Gastric Cancer

Peter C Enzinger, MD
Director, Center for Esophageal and Gastric Cancer
Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Massachusetts

Charles S Fuchs, MD, MPH
Richard Sackler and Jonathan Sackler
Professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology)
Director, Yale Cancer Center
Physician-in-Chief
Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale New Haven
New Haven, Connecticut

Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Anthony El-Khoueiry, MD
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine
Medical Director of Clinical Investigations Support Office
Phase I Program Director
USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center
Los Angeles, California

Tim Greten, MD
Bethesda, Maryland

Melanoma

Adil Daud, MD
Director, Melanoma Program
Clinical Professor of Medicine
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco, California

Evan J Lipson, MD
Associate Professor, Medical Oncology
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy
The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
Baltimore, Maryland

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Matthew S Davids, MD, MMSc
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Director, DFCI Lymphoma BioBank
Associate Director, CLL Center
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Massachusetts

Nitin Jain, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Department of Leukemia
The University of Texas
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, Texas

Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

John P Leonard, MD
Richard T Silver Distinguished Professor of Hematology and Medical Oncology
Associate Dean for Clinical Research
Associate Director, Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center
Executive Vice Chair, Joan and Sanford I Weill Department of Medicine
Weill Cornell Medicine
New York, New York

Craig Moskowitz, MD
Physician in Chief, Oncology Service Line
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center
Professor of Medicine, Miller School of Medicine
University of Miami Health System
Don Soffer Clinical Research Center
Miami, Florida

Ovarian Cancer

Robert L Coleman, MD
Professor and Executive Director, Cancer Network Research
Anne Rife Cox Chair in Gynecology
Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine
The University of Texas
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, Texas

Ursula Matulonis, MD
Chief, Division of Gynecologic Oncology
Brock-Wilson Family Chair
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Boston, Massachusetts

Pancreatic Cancer

Andrew H Ko, MD
Professor and Interim Chief (Oncology)
Department of Medicine (Hematology/Oncology)
University of California, San Francisco
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
San Francisco, California

Philip A Philip, MD, PhD
Kathryn Cramer Endowed Chair in Cancer Research
Professor of Oncology and Pharmacology
Leader, GI and Neuroendocrine Oncology
Vice President of Medical Affairs
Karmanos Cancer Institute
Wayne State University
Detroit, Michigan

ER-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

Harold J Burstein, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Breast Oncology Center
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Massachusetts

George W Sledge Jr, MD
Professor of Medicine
Chief, Division of Oncology
Department of Medicine
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, California

HER2-Positive and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Joyce O’Shaughnessy, MD
Chair, Breast Cancer Research Program
Baylor Charles A Sammons Cancer Center
Celebrating Women Chair in Breast Cancer Research
Texas Oncology
US Oncology
Dallas, Texas

Eric P Winer, MD
Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs
Chief, Division of Breast Oncology
Thompson Chair in Breast Cancer Research
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Boston, Massachusetts

Sunday — 8:00 AM – 12:15 PM

Acute Leukemias

Daniel A Pollyea, MD, MS
Associate Professor of Medicine
Clinical Director of Leukemia Services
Robert H Allen, MD Chair in Hematology Research
Division of Hematology
University of Colorado School of Medicine
Aurora, Colorado

Richard M Stone, MD
Director, Translational Research
Leukemia Division
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Boston, Massachusetts

Prostate Cancer

Maha Hussain, MD
Genevieve Teuton Professor of Medicine
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Deputy Director
Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Chicago, Illinois

A Oliver Sartor, MD
CE and Bernadine Laborde Professor for Cancer Research
Medical Director, Tulane Cancer Center
Assistant Dean for Oncology
Tulane Medical School
New Orleans, Louisiana

Renal Cell Carcinoma and Bladder Cancer

Elizabeth R Plimack, MD, MS
Chief, Division of Genitourinary Medical Oncology
Director, Genitourinary Clinical Research
Associate Professor, Department of Hematology/Oncology
Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple Health
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

David I Quinn, MBBS, PhD
Medical Director
Norris Cancer Hospital and Clinics
Head, GU Cancer Section
Division of Cancer Medicine and Blood Diseases
USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center
Los Angeles, California

Targeted Treatment of Lung Cancer

Geoffrey R Oxnard, MD
Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Boston, Massachusetts

Lecia V Sequist, MD, MPH
Director, Center for Innovation in Early
Cancer Detection
Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center
The Landry Family Associate Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Boston, Massachusetts

Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

Matthew Gubens, MD, MS
Associate Professor, Thoracic Medical Oncology
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco, California

Joel W Neal, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Division of Oncology
Stanford Cancer Institute
Stanford University
Palo Alto, California

 

Friday, February 22nd

6:30 PM Welcome Reception

7:00 PM Keynote Address — Dr Porter
Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cell Therapy and the General Medical Oncologist

Presentation topics

  • Biology of CD19-targeted CAR T cells, manufacturing and administration processes for CAR T-cell therapy and compositional and mechanistic similarities and differences among available and investigational anti-CD19-directed CAR T-cell platforms
  • Available data with and ongoing trials evaluating anti-CD19-directed CAR T-cell therapy; magnitude and timing of the toxicities associated with various anti-CD19 CAR T-cell constructs
  • Optimal integration of CAR T-cell therapy into current treatment algorithms; role of the general medical oncologist in facilitating the consideration of CAR T-cell therapy
  • Development of CAR T-cell platforms directed at other targets beyond CD19 (eg, BCMA, CD30); ongoing clinical trials and future directions for T-cell therapy (“off-the-shelf” CAR T cells, et cetera)

7:30 PM Panel Discussion and Moderated Q&A Session — Drs Kaufman, Neelapu and Porter

Select questions to be addressed during moderated panel discussion

  • Do you believe fundamental differences exist among the available and investigational anti-CD19 CAR T-cell platforms that make one preferable to another? How do the available data with axicabtagene ciloleucel, tisagenlecleucel and lisocabtagene maraleucel compare in terms of efficacy and safety? Are outcomes with these agents largely the same, or are there differences?
  • When in the treatment course should a general medical oncologist introduce the concept of CAR T-cell therapy to a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)? When should patients be referred to an authorized center for initial discussion/consideration of CAR T-cell therapy?
  • How long does it typically take from the time a patient is initially referred for CAR T-cell therapy until he/she actually receives the treatment? What percentage of patients experience disease progression too quickly to ultimately receive therapy?
  • What percentage of patients with DLBCL who receive CAR T-cell therapy will be alive at 1 year? What about 2 years?
  • How do the response rates and incidence and severity of toxicity compare when anti-CD19 CAR T-cell constructs are administered for DLBCL versus acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL)? Are these therapies safe and effective for adults with ALL?
  • What is the current development timeline for CAR T-cell therapy in multiple myeloma (MM)? What clinical trials of CAR T-cell therapy are you currently prioritizing for your patients with MM?
  • From a biologic standpoint, why is BCMA a better target for CAR T-cell therapy than CD19 in MM? How different are the BCMA platforms under investigation in MM than the available anti-CD19 CAR T-cell platforms?
  • When, if at all, in the treatment course should a general medical oncologist introduce the concept of CAR T-cell therapy to a patient with MM? In general, how many lines of therapy should a typical patient receive before being considered for CAR T-cell therapy?
  • Do patients with MM and high-risk features such as del(17p) respond differently to CAR T-cell therapy? What about those who have undergone transplant versus those who have not?
  • What fraction of patients experience virtually no toxicity with CAR T-cell therapy? What is the frequency of fatal toxicity? When do toxicities generally occur? Does any correlation exist between the incidence and severity of toxicity and therapeutic benefit?

8:30 PM Adjourn

Saturday, February 23rd

Prior to the conference, RTP invited participants to complete a survey about the composition of their clinical practice, the results of which have been tabulated and will be presented at the start of each module to provide a contextual framework. Afterward, the faculty will deliver short presentations on emerging clinical research and recently approved or investigational agents and strategies related to their assigned topics. Throughout each presentation, Dr Love will interject questions, reveal interactive audience polling results and introduce other related topics and queries submitted using the iPads® provided. Finally, to support the theme of the conference, the final portion of each module will include a review of “oncology boards” questions designed to help appropriate clinicians prepare for upcoming recertification.

8:00 AM Module 1: Colorectal and Gastric Cancer

Colorectal Cancer (CRC) — Dr Fuchs

  • Correlation of tumor location with long-term outcomes in metastatic CRC (mCRC); emerging data linking tumor sidedness to response to specific therapies
  • Research supporting the FDA approvals of pembrolizumab, nivolumab and nivolumab/ipilimumab for MSI-high mCRC; patient selection for anti-PD-1 monotherapy or combination therapy
  • Clinical implications of the Phase II REVERCE and ReDOS trials evaluating the earlier use of regorafenib and alternative dosing strategies with that agent, respectively
  • Optimal sequencing of regorafenib and TAS-102 for patients with mCRC; use of clinical characteristics to inform this decision
  • Available and emerging research information (eg, BEACON CRC study) evaluating the use of combination BRAF/MEK/EGFR inhibition for patients with BRAF V600E tumor mutations

Gastric, Gastroesophageal Junction (GEJ) and Esophageal Cancer — Dr Enzinger

  • Integration of ramucirumab into current clinical algorithms for metastatic gastric/GEJ cancer; impact, if any, of age, performance status, prior therapeutic exposure and comorbidities on its use as second-line therapy
  • Research supporting the FDA approval of pembrolizumab for recurrent or advanced gastric/GEJ adenocarcinoma with a PD-L1 combined positive score (CPS) ≥1 after 2 or more lines of chemotherapy and, if appropriate, HER2-targeted therapy; clinical and research implications of the negative Phase III KEYNOTE-061 trial
  • Design, entry criteria and endpoints in the Phase III TAGS study of TAS-102 for patients with heavily pretreated metastatic gastric cancer; potential role in clinical practice
  • Results from the Phase III KEYNOTE-181 trial evaluating pembrolizumab versus single-agent chemotherapy as second-line treatment for locally advanced or metastatic esophageal or esophagogastric junction carcinoma

8:45 AM Module 2: Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

Anti-VEGF-Directed Therapy — Dr El-Khoueiry

  • Efficacy and safety outcomes from the Phase III REFLECT trial comparing lenvatinib to sorafenib as first-line therapy for unresectable HCC; recent FDA approval of lenvatinib and patient selection for its use in routine practice
  • Clinical trial data informing the FDA approval and clinical use of regorafenib for patients with disease progression on sorafenib; optimal starting dose as second-line therapy
  • Major efficacy and tolerability findings from the CELESTIAL trial; recent FDA approval of cabozantinib for patients who have experienced disease progression on sorafenib
  • Design, eligibility criteria and key findings from the Phase III REACH-2 study of second-line ramucirumab for patients with progressive HCC and elevated alpha-fetoprotein levels

Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors — Dr Greten

  • Available efficacy and safety results from pivotal clinical trials of nivolumab and pembrolizumab for patients with disease progression on sorafenib; factors guiding the use of immunotherapy versus targeted therapy for these patients
  • Recent FDA approval of pembrolizumab for HCC in patients who have previously received sorafenib; optimal integration into practice
  • Biologic rationale for and early trial data with atezolizumab/bevacizumab as first-line therapy for advanced HCC; FDA breakthrough therapy designation and ongoing Phase III evaluation (IMbrave150 trial)
  • Ongoing clinical trials evaluating anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies alone or in combination with other immunotherapeutic or targeted approaches for patients with newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory HCC

9:30 AM Break

9:45 AM Module 3: Melanoma

Adjuvant Therapy — Dr Lipson

  • Published efficacy and safety data from the Phase III CheckMate 238 trial evaluating adjuvant nivolumab versus ipilimumab for patients with resected melanoma at high risk for recurrence
  • Design of, entry criteria for and primary efficacy and safety outcomes from the Phase III COMBI-AD study evaluating dabrafenib/trametinib as adjuvant treatment for high-risk melanoma with a BRAF V600 tumor mutation after surgical resection; FDA-approved dose, schedule and indication for adjuvant dabrafenib/trametinib
  • Clinical, biologic and practical factors influencing the decision to administer nivolumab versus dabrafenib/trametinib as adjuvant therapy and vice versa
  • Key efficacy outcomes from the Phase III KEYNOTE-054 trial comparing pembrolizumab to placebo after complete resection of high-risk Stage III melanoma

Metastatic Disease — Dr Daud

  • Patient selection for anti-PD-1 monotherapy versus combination treatment with anti-PD-1/anti-CTLA-4 therapy in the first-line setting; impact of age/performance status, prior therapeutic exposure, symptomatology and other clinical factors
  • Key efficacy and safety outcomes from the Phase III COLUMBUS trial evaluating the combination of encorafenib/binimetinib versus vemurafenib for patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF tumor mutation; FDA approval of encorafenib/binimetinib and clinical, biologic and practical factors affecting the selection of a specific BRAF/MEK inhibitor combination
  • Early data with and ongoing evaluation of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in combination with other systemic approaches (eg, BRAF/MEK inhibitors, relatlimab)

10:35 AM Module 4: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Newly Diagnosed CLL — Dr Davids

  • Identification and clinical relevance of existing and emerging biomarkers (del[17p], IGHV mutations, TP53 mutations, complex karyotype, et cetera) to inform patient risk assessment and therapeutic decision-making
  • Design of, eligibility requirements for and primary and secondary endpoints evaluated in the Phase III iLLUMINATE trial comparing obinutuzumab/ibrutinib to obinutuzumab/chlorambucil for patients with treatment-naïve CLL; recent FDA approval of obinutuzumab/ibrutinib and optimal integration into clinical practice
  • Other recently presented Phase III data sets (eg, ECOG-E1912, Alliance A041202) evaluating ibrutinib-based therapy versus standard chemoimmunotherapeutic regimens as first-line treatment for CLL

Management of Relapsed/Refractory CLL and Investigational Approaches — Dr Jain

  • Key efficacy and safety findings from the Phase III MURANO trial comparing venetoclax/rituximab to bendamustine/rituximab for relapsed/refractory CLL; recent FDA approval of venetoclax in combination with rituximab for relapsed/refractory CLL regardless of biomarker status and optimal integration into clinical practice
  • Mechanistic and pharmacodynamic similarities and differences between ibrutinib and acalabrutinib; potential effect on efficacy and safety
  • Available efficacy findings with the use of acalabrutinib monotherapy for patients with CLL; inclusion of acalabrutinib in current NCCN guidelines and implications for clinical use
  • Biologic rationale for and early efficacy and safety data with other novel combination approaches (eg, ibrutinib/venetoclax, ibrutinib/FCR, obinutuzumab/ibrutinib/venetoclax); ongoing Phase III trials

11:25 AM Module 5: Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

Follicular Lymphoma (FL) — Dr Leonard

  • Available safety and efficacy outcomes from the GALLIUM study; current clinical role of obinutuzumab-based induction and maintenance therapy for previously untreated FL
  • Clinical and research implications of the Phase III RELEVANCE trial results evaluating the “R-squared” regimen of lenalidomide/rituximab in newly diagnosed FL
  • Results from the AUGMENT trial comparing R-squared to rituximab alone for patients with relapsed/refractory indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma; current clinical role of R-squared for patients with relapsed/refractory disease
  • Patient selection for PI3 kinase inhibition in relapsed/refractory FL; appropriate integration of idelalisib, copanlisib and duvelisib into current management algorithms

Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) and Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) — Dr Moskowitz

  • Research database supporting the FDA approval of acalabrutinib in relapsed/refractory MCL; patient selection for its use in clinical practice
  • Available data with and ongoing Phase III evaluation of novel combination strategies in MCL (eg, SHINE, SYMPATICO, TRIANGLE, ACE-LY-308)
  • Clinical implications of the recent FDA approval of brentuximab vedotin (BV) with doxorubicin/vinblastine/dacarbazine (AVD) as first-line therapy for advanced classical HL; patient selection for BV-AVD in routine practice
  • Quality of PET scanning in community-based settings and applicability of clinical trial results with PET-adapted therapy in HL to general practice

12:15 PM Lunch

1:00 PM Module 6: Ovarian Cancer (OC)

Current and Future Role of PARP Inhibitors in the Treatment of OC — Dr Coleman

  • Results from the Phase III SOLO-1 trial evaluating maintenance therapy with olaparib for patients with advanced OC and a BRCA mutation after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy; recent FDA approval of this approach and implications for clinical practice
  • Other ongoing Phase III clinical trials evaluating PARP inhibition alone or in combination with systemic approaches in the first-line setting (eg, PRIMA, PAOLA-1, ATHENA, GOG-3005, DUO-O)
  • FDA indications and patient selection for niraparib, olaparib or rucaparib for platinum-sensitive recurrent disease; patient- or disease-specific factors that influence the prioritization of one agent versus another
  • Design, recently presented results and clinical implications of the Phase II QUADRA study of niraparib for patients with relapsed OC, regardless of mutation status, who have received 3 or more prior chemotherapy regimens

Other Recently Approved and Promising Investigational Strategies — Dr Matulonis

  • Available research data with and current clinical role of bevacizumab as a component of up-front therapy for patients with newly diagnosed OC
  • Mechanism of action of mirvetuximab soravtansine and biologic rationale for targeting the folate receptor in ovarian and other gynecologic cancers
  • Available safety and efficacy data with and active Phase III trials of mirvetuximab soravtansine for patients with OC
  • Biologic rationale for, available data with and ongoing evaluation of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies alone or in combination with chemotherapy or other systemic therapy (eg, PARP inhibitors, anti-angiogenic agents) for patients with OC

1:50 PM Module 7: Pancreatic Cancer

Neoadjuvant and Adjuvant Therapy — Dr Ko

  • Eligibility for and key efficacy and safety outcomes from the Phase III Unicancer GI PRODIGE 24/CCTG PA.6 trial of adjuvant mFOLFIRINOX versus gemcitabine for patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAD); clinical implications and patient selection for adjuvant mFOLFIRINOX
  • Design of, entry criteria for and primary and secondary endpoints being assessed in the Phase III APACT trial evaluating nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab) paclitaxel/gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone in the adjuvant setting
  • Improvements in overall survival, recurrence rates and rates of resection observed with the use of preoperative chemora­diation therapy compared to immediate surgery in patients with resectable and borderline resectable PAD enrolled in the Phase III PREOPANC-1 trial; clinical implications
  • Available data with and clinical use of contemporary chemotherapy regimens (eg, mFOLFIRINOX, nab paclitaxel/gemcitabine) with or without radiation therapy as neoadjuvant treatment for resectable or borderline resectable disease

Metastatic Disease — Dr Philip

  • Impact of earlier use of contemporary chemotherapy regimens (eg, neoadjuvant/adjuvant mFOLFIRINOX and nab paclitaxel/gemcitabine) on therapeutic selection in the metastatic setting
  • Recent meta-analysis of second-line clinical trials in progressive PAD; improvement in overall and progression-free survival associated with the use of irinotecan-based regimens compared to oxaliplatin-based therapy and clinical implications
  • Published research experience with, patient selection for and practical integration of nal-IRI (nanoliposomal irinotecan) in relapsed metastatic PAD
  • Other promising agents and strategies under active investigation

2:35 PM Break

2:50 PM Module 8: ER-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer (BC)

Recent Clinical Trial Results Guiding the Use of Genomic Classifiers in the Management of Early BC (EBC); Ongoing Evaluation of CDK4/6 Inhibition in Earlier-Stage Disease — Dr Burstein

  • Design, eligibility criteria, primary and secondary endpoints and major clinical findings from the Phase III TAILORx low- and intermediate-risk cohorts
  • Clinical implications of TAILORx intermediate-risk cohort results on adjuvant treatment decision-making for pre- and postmenopausal patients with EBC
  • Recent updates to NCCN guidelines regarding the prioritization and current role of genomic assays in decision-making for patients with node-negative and node-positive, ER-positive EBC
  • Early activity and safety data with CDK4/6 inhibitors in the neoadjuvant setting; ongoing Phase III evaluation of CDK4/6 inhibition as adjuvant therapy (eg, PALLAS, PENELOPE-B, EarLEE-1, monarchE studies)

Sequence and Selection of Systemic Therapy for Patients with ER-Positive Metastatic BC (mBC); Novel Agents in Development — Dr Sledge

  • Similarities and differences among commercially available CDK4/6 inhibitors and implications, if any, for the care of patients with ER-positive mBC
  • Published research data with and current clinical role of CDK4/6 inhibitors in premenopausal, postmenopausal and elderly patients with ER-positive mBC; incidence and severity of toxicities observed in patients receiving palbociclib, ribociclib or abemaciclib in pivotal trials
  • Optimal management of disease progressing on CDK4/6 inhibitors in combination with hormonal therapy
  • Design, eligibility criteria and key efficacy and safety findings from the Phase III SOLAR-1 trial evaluating the alpha-specific PI3K inhibitor alpelisib in combination with fulvestrant for postmenopausal patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative mBC with PIK3CA mutations and disease progression on or after an aromatase inhibitor with or without a CDK4/6 inhibitor

3:40 PM Module 9: HER2-Positive and Triple-Negative BC

Triple-Negative BC; PARP Inhibition in the Management of BC — Dr Winer

  • Results from the Phase III IMpassion130 trial evaluating atezolizumab in combination with nab paclitaxel as first-line therapy for metastatic triple-negative BC; potential role in clinical practice
  • Ongoing Phase III studies evaluating anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies alone or in combination with other systemic therapies for localized, locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer
  • Phase III data sets supporting the FDA approvals for olaparib (OlympiAD) and talazoparib (EMBRACA) for patients with mBC and a BRCA germline mutation
  • Recommended genetic testing algorithms and patient selection for PARP inhibition in general oncology practice

HER2-Positive Disease — Dr O’Shaughnessy

  • FDA approval of and patient selection for pertuzumab as a component of adjuvant treatment; indications for the use of adjuvant pertuzumab in patients receiving it as a component of neoadjuvant therapy
  • Key efficacy and safety results from the Phase III KATHERINE trial of adjuvant T-DM1 versus trastuzumab for patients with HER2-positive primary BC with residual disease after preoperative therapy
  • Optimal integration of postadjuvant neratinib into current clinical algorithms; prophylaxis and management of associated side effects
  • Differential mechanisms of action of, early activity and safety data with and ongoing evaluation of novel HER2-directed therapies (eg, tucatinib, margetuximab, trastuzumab deruxtecan)

4:30 PM Adjourn

Sunday, February 24th

8:00 AM Module 10: Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Current Testing Algorithms; Treatment for Patients with a Genomic Alteration — Dr Stone

  • Assessment, incidence and prognostic or predictive relevance of cytogenetic and other molecular biomarkers (eg, FLT3 mutations, IDH1/2 mutations)
  • Clinical database underlying the FDA approval of midostaurin for patients with newly diagnosed AML and a FLT3 mutation; patient selection for and practical aspects related to its administration
  • Available efficacy and safety data with gilteritinib and quizartinib in patients with relapsed/refractory FLT3-positive disease; recent FDA approval of gilteritinib and appropriate integration into routine practice
  • Published research database supporting the recent FDA approvals of the IDH inhibitors enasidenib and ivosidenib; optimal integration into current algorithms

Recently Approved and Emerging Therapeutic Approaches — Dr Pollyea

  • Published efficacy data supporting the FDA approval of venetoclax in combination with a hypomethylating agent or low-dose cytarabine as first-line treatment for patients with AML who are ineligible for intensive chemotherapy
  • Incidence of tumor lysis syndrome associated with the use of venetoclax in AML in clinical trials; application to routine practice and recommendations for venetoclax administration in the community
  • Available data with and current clinical role of CPX-351 for newly diagnosed, therapy-related AML or AML with myelodysplastic syndrome-related cytogenetic abnormalities; ongoing evaluation in other AML populations
  • Design, entry criteria and key efficacy findings from the Phase II BRIGHT 1003 trial of glasdegib with low-dose cytarabine versus low-dose cytarabine alone for patients with newly diagnosed AML unfit for intensive chemotherapy; recent FDA approval and clinical role

8:50 AM Module 11: Prostate Cancer (PC)

Nonmetastatic Castration-Resistant PC (CRPC) and Metastatic Hormone-Sensitive PC (mHSPC) — Dr Hussain

  • Published findings from the Phase III PROSPER and SPARTAN trials evaluating enzalutamide and apalutamide, respectively, for patients with nonmetastatic CRPC
  • Design, eligibility criteria and key efficacy and safety data from the Phase III ARAMIS trial evaluating darolutamide for patients with high-risk nonmetastatic CRPC
  • Long-term efficacy and quality-of-life data associated with the use of docetaxel or abiraterone acetate and prednisone in combination with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for men with mHSPC; key clinical and practical factors guiding the selection of docetaxel or abiraterone
  • Key findings from and potential clinical implications of the Phase III ARCHES study comparing enzalutamide and ADT to ADT alone for patients with mHSPC
  • Other ongoing Phase III trials in mHSPC (eg, ARASENS, TITAN, PEACE-1)

Key Issues in the Treatment of Metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) — Dr Sartor

  • Impact of earlier use of chemotherapy and secondary hormonal therapy for M0 or metastatic hormone-sensitive disease on the selection and sequencing of systemic treatment for mCRPC
  • Available clinical trial data with the use of olaparib and rucaparib in patients with progressive mCRPC; FDA breakthrough therapy designations and ongoing Phase III trials with these agents
  • Incidence of MSI-high/mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mCRPC; indications for MSI/MMR testing and current role of immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with and without MSI-high/MMR-deficient disease
  • Design, eligibility criteria and key efficacy and safety findings from the Phase III ERA223 trial evaluating radium-223 in combination with abiraterone for chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC; implications for current practice and ongoing research
  • Early activity and safety results and ongoing evaluation of other novel radiopharmaceuticals (eg, 177Lu-PSMA-617)

9:40 AM Module 12: Renal Cell and Bladder Cancer

Renal Cell Cancer (RCC) — Dr Quinn

  • Supporting research database underlying the FDA approvals of nivolumab/ipilimumab and cabozantinib for patients with newly diagnosed metastatic RCC (mRCC); patient selection for the use of these approaches in clinical practice
  • Key clinical findings from the Phase III IMmotion151 study of atezolizumab/bevacizumab versus sunitinib for untreated mRCC
  • Available data from the Phase III JAVELIN Renal 101 study comparing avelumab/axitinib to sunitinib for patients with treatment-naïve advanced RCC
  • Design, eligibility criteria and emerging efficacy data from the Phase III KEYNOTE-426 trial evaluating pembrolizumab in combination with axitinib as first-line treatment for locally advanced or metastatic RCC
  • Emerging data with and ongoing evaluation of other anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in combination with multikinase inhibitors (eg, pembrolizumab/lenvatinib)

Urothelial Bladder Cancer (UBC) — Dr Plimack

  • Rationale for and clinical implications of recent revision of FDA approvals of atezolizumab and pembrolizumab limiting their use for patients with advanced UBC who are ineligible for cisplatin-based therapy
  • Novel applications with anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies under investigation for patients with metastatic UBC: Combination regimens with anti-CTLA-4 antibodies, chemotherapy or targeted therapy
  • Available data with and ongoing Phase III trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with nonmetastatic UBC
  • FDA breakthrough therapy designations for enfortumab vedotin and erdafitinib for patients with locally advanced or metastatic UBC; ongoing trials and development timelines

10:30 AM Break

10:45 AM Module 13: Targeted Treatment of Lung Cancer

Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) with an EGFR Tumor Mutation — Dr Oxnard

  • Guideline-endorsed testing algorithms for patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung; validation of and indications, if any, for plasma-based assays to identify EGFR and other mutations/alterations in patients with advanced NSCLC
  • Available efficacy and safety data with osimertinib as first-line therapy for patients with EGFR tumor mutations; implications of mutation type on use of osimertinib
  • Documented activity of osimertinib in patients with CNS metastases
  • Optimal treatment of disease that has progressed on first-line EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy; incidence, clinical relevance and spectrum of resistance mechanisms in patients experiencing progression on osimertinib

Other Actionable Abnormalities in NSCLC — Dr Sequist

  • Available clinical trial data informing the selection of first- and later-line therapy for patients with metastatic NSCLC and an ALK rearrangement
  • Published efficacy and safety data with “next-generation” ROS1 inhibitors: Lorlatinib, entrectinib, et cetera
  • Mechanism of action of, available data with and ongoing evaluation of LOXO-292 in patients with RET fusion-driven NSCLC and other cancers
  • Identification and management of NSCLC with other genomic alterations (eg, BRAF V600E, MET exon 14, NTRK)

11:30 AM Module 14: Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

Locally Advanced NSCLC; Metastatic Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) — Dr Gubens

  • Design, eligibility criteria and key efficacy findings from the Phase III PACIFIC trial of consolidation durvalumab after chemoradiation therapy for patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC
  • Efficacy and current role of durvalumab in prespecified subgroups (eg, histology, smoking status, PD-L1 status, disease with a targetable genomic alteration)
  • Ongoing evaluation of other anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in the localized and locally advanced settings
  • Design of, eligibility criteria for and key efficacy and safety findings from the Phase III IMpower133 trial evaluating carboplatin/etoposide with or without atezolizumab for patients with untreated extensive-stage SCLC; appropriate integration of carboplatin/etoposide/atezolizumab into current SCLC management
  • Available efficacy and safety data with the use anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies alone or in combination with anti-CTLA-4 antibodies for patients with progressive metastatic SCLC

Metastatic NSCLC — Dr Neal

  • Implications of the Phase III KEYNOTE-042 and KEYNOTE-189 trial results; clinical and biologic factors affecting the selection of anti-PD-1 monotherapy versus combined chemotherapy/immune checkpoint inhibition
  • Key efficacy and safety findings from the Phase III IMpower150 study evaluating atezolizumab/bevacizumab in combination with carboplatin/paclitaxel for chemotherapy-naïve advanced nonsquamous NSCLC; clinical implications of the recent FDA approval of this combination
  • Key safety and efficacy results from the Phase III IMpower130 and 132 trials of the addition of atezolizumab to chemotherapy for metastatic nonsquamous NSCLC
  • Role of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment for advanced squamous NSCLC; results from the Phase III KEYNOTE-407 and IMpower131 trials

12:15 PM Close

Target Audience:
This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of medical oncologists, hematologists, hematology-oncology fellows, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and other allied cancer professionals.

Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Effectively apply the results of practice-changing clinical research to the care of patients with breast, lung, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, dermatologic, ovarian and select hematologic cancers.
  • Appraise the clinical relevance of recent pivotal cancer research results published in peer-reviewed journals and/or presented at major oncology conferences.
  • Recall ongoing trials in breast, lung, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, dermatologic, ovarian and select hematologic cancers, and refer appropriate patients for study participation.
  • Use an understanding of tumor biomarkers and single and multigene signatures to individualize the care of patients with cancer.
  • Educate patients with diverse hematologic cancers and solid tumors about the benefits and risks of new therapeutic agents and strategies.
  • Refine or validate existing cancer-specific treatment algorithms based on exposure to new data sets and the perspectives of tumor-specific clinical investigators.
  • Evaluate the mechanisms of action, tolerability and efficacy of promising investigational agents, and consider their potential implications for clinical practice.

Accreditation Statements:
Research To Practice is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Research To Practice is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

CME Credit Designation Statement:
Research To Practice designates this live activity for a maximum of 12.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

CNE Credit Designation Statement:
This educational activity for 12.75 contact hours is provided by Research To Practice.

This activity is awarded 12.75 ANCC pharmacotherapeutic contact hours.

ONCC/ILNA Certification:
This program will be submitted for ONCC/ILNA certification.

CME Credit Form:
A credit form will be given to each participant at the conclusion of the activity.

CNE Credit Form:
To obtain a certificate of completion and receive credit for this event, nurses must sign in at the registration desk upon arrival, attend the entire activity and return a completed Educational Assessment and Credit Form upon exiting the activity.

American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) — Maintenance of Certification (MOC):
Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 12.75 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

Please note, this program has been specifically designed for the following ABIM specialty: medical oncology.

Personal information and data sharing: Research To Practice aggregates deidentified user data for program-use analysis, program development, activity planning and site improvement. We may provide aggregate and deidentified data to third parties, including commercial supporters. We do not share or sell personally identifiable information to any unaffiliated third parties or commercial supporters. Please see our privacy policy at ResearchToPractice.com/Privacy-Policy for more information. For those clinicians wishing to receive ABIM MOC credit for attending, you will receive an email after the event with instructions.

Disclosure Policy:
Research To Practice (RTP) is committed to providing its participants with high-quality, unbiased and state-of-the-art education. We assess conflicts of interest with faculty, planners and managers of CME/CNE activities. Conflicts of interest are identified and resolved through a conflict of interest resolution process. In addition, all activity content is reviewed by both a member of the RTP scientific staff and an external, independent physician reviewer for fair balance, scientific objectivity of studies referenced and patient care recommendations. Financial disclosures will be provided in meeting course materials.

Unlabeled/Unapproved Uses Notice:
There is no implied or real endorsement of any product by Research To Practice, the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education or American Nurses Credentialing Center. Any off-label use as declared by the FDA will be identified.

Educational Support:
This activity is supported by educational grants from AbbVie Inc, Acerta Pharma — A member of the AstraZeneca Group, Agios Pharmaceuticals Inc, Array BioPharma Inc, Astellas and Pfizer Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Celgene Corporation, Eisai Inc, Exelixis Inc, Genentech, Genomic Health Inc, Gilead Sciences Inc, ImmunoGen Inc, Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals Inc, Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc, Merck, Novartis, Pharmacyclics LLC, an AbbVie Company/Janssen Biotech Inc, administered by Janssen Scientific Affairs LLC, Sanofi Genzyme, Seattle Genetics and Takeda Oncology. Additional support to be announced.

Research To Practice CME/CNE Planning Committee Members, Staff and Reviewers: Planners, scientific staff and independent reviewers for Research To Practice have no relevant conflicts of interest to disclose.

JW Marriott Miami Turnberry Resort
19999 West Country Club Drive
Miami, FL 33180
Hotel Phone: (305) 932-6200

Meeting Room:
Garden Ballroom (Lobby Level)

Room Reservations:
A special discounted room rate of $329 (plus applicable tax and discounted resort fee of $25) is available to conference attendees at the JW Marriott Miami Turnberry Resort. Instructions on how to secure accommodations will be included in your registration confirmation email.

Room reservations must be made by Friday, February 8, 2019. A limited number of rooms are available, and we encourage you to make your reservations early. After Friday, February 8, 2019, the hotel will offer the best rates based on room availability.


This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of medical oncologists, hematologists, hematology-oncology fellows, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and other allied cancer professionals.

Registration Fees:
This event is free of charge for practicing physicians, fellows, nurses and other healthcare providers involved in the treatment of cancer.

For all other individuals, including industry professionals,* a conference registration fee of $850 is available through February 1, 2019 and then $950 after this day. All fees processed will be nonrefundable after January 30, 2019 (5:00 PM Eastern Time). To cancel your registration, please contact our Meeting Services department at Meetings@ResearchToPractice.com or call (800) 233-6153.

* Individuals employed by for-profit organizations, including financial institutions, biotech or pharmaceutical companies

Registration for clinicians in practice

I am a practicing physician, fellow, nurse or other healthcare provider involved in the treatment of cancer.

Registration for clinicians in practice »
 
Registration for other/industry professionals

I am employed by a for-profit organization, including a financial institution, biotech or pharmaceutical company.

Registration for other/industry professionals »
 
Registration for groups
If you are registering a group (more than 1 person) for this event, please contact us at Meetings@ResearchToPractice.com or (800) 233-6153.
To ensure seating, please check in at our onsite registration desk at least 30 minutes before the start of the meeting. We cannot guarantee seating after the start of the program.

Meal service will be provided to those who attend the program, based on availability.

Photography and/or video recording may be taken during the educational program by Research To Practice and used in future educational programs.

Research To Practice fully complies with the legal requirements of the ADA. If you are in need of assistance (ie, physical, dietary, et cetera), please contact us prior to the event at (800) 233-6153.